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2017 NIGMS Director’s Early Career Investigator Lecture – Drug Metabolism, Pharmacogenetics and the Quest to Personalize HIV Treatment and Prevention

Location: Balcony A
Natcher Conference Center (Building 45)
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, Maryland
Start Date: 4/5/2017 2:00 PM
End Date: 4/5/2017 3:00 PM

WatchVideocast of the lecture (live or later)

2017 Early Career Investigator Lecture -Drug Metabolism, Pharmacogenetics and the Quest to Personalize HIV Treatment and PreventionSpeaker: Namandjé N. Bumpus, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Medicine-Division of Clinical Pharmacology
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Format: Lecture followed by Q&A session

Research Summary

Work in my lab is performed through the lens of seeking to understand the impact of drug metabolism specifically on drug outcomes. Drug metabolism is the process by which an enzyme biochemically modifies a drug, usually resulting in the conversion of the drug into a “metabolite” that can be readily excreted from the body. When drugs are taken orally, they must pass through the liver, which contains an abundance of drug metabolizing enzymes, before entering systemic circulation.

When I began my research program in 2010, there was a paucity of data regarding the molecular pathways that regulated the metabolism of several widely prescribed antiretroviral drugs. In addition, there were few insights into how the metabolites of these antiretrovirals might contribute to the drugs’ pharmacology and toxicology.

With this in mind, my group began to systematically examine the metabolism and distribution of antiretrovirals and probe the effects of metabolites on cellular signaling pathways. We’re applying transdisciplinary approaches to facilitate the rational selection and dosing of antiretroviral drugs that can be used to treat and prevent HIV-1 infection. Our overarching hypothesis is that through integrating a mechanistic understanding of the metabolism and distribution of antiretrovirals in cells and tissues, we can move towards being able to predict drug responses in a given individual.

Biographical Sketch

Bumpus received her Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of Michigan, working in Paul Hollenberg’s laboratory. She then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Eric Johnson’s lab at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California. Bumpus joined the faculty at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 2010.

Bumpus serves as an associate editor of Drug Metabolism and Disposition. She is also a regular member of the NIH Xenobiotic and Nutrient Disposition and Action study section and secretary/treasurer-elect for the Division for Drug Metabolism of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

She has been honored with several scientific awards, including the Tanabe Young Investigator Award from the American College of Clinical Pharmacology, the Drug Metabolism Early Career Achievement Award from the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, the Leon I. Goldberg Young Investigator Award from the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

NIGMS has supported Bumpus’ research under grant R01GM103853 since 2013.

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This page last reviewed on March 30, 2017