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Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (RISE) Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions


 

Preparing and Submitting a New Application

Q. Where can I find the most recent RISE Program Announcement?

A. The most recent RISE Program Announcement (PAR-16-361) is available on the Web at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-361.html.

Q. What is the goal of the RISE program?

A. The goal of the RISE program is to increase the number of students from underrepresented (UR) groups in biomedical research who successfully complete the Ph.D. degree in these fields. In doing so, the overarching expectation is that through its support of new and ongoing institutionally-designed student and faculty developmental programs, the RISE program will help reduce the gap in the completion of Ph.D. degrees between UR and non-UR students in the biomedical sciences at the national level. At the institutional level, it is expected that the following objectives will be achieved:

  • An increase in the overall number of UR students that complete a Ph.D. and continue biomedical research careers;
  • At least 50 percent of undergraduate (UG) and 75 percent of master’s RISE-supported students will enter into a Ph.D. program within 3 years after graduation; and
  • At least 80 percent of RISE-supported Ph.D. students will complete the degree.

Q. What types of institutions are eligible to apply for a RISE grant?

A. RISE applications may be submitted by institutions that have a historical mission focused on serving students from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical research. In addition, eligible institutions must award science degrees to undergraduate (B.S. or B.A.) and/or graduate students (M.S. or Ph.D.).

Most institutions of higher learning have mission statements that identify the foci of the institution and the student populations that it seeks to educate and serve. If your institution’s mission statement explicitly states that its mission is to educate students from any of the populations that have been identified as underrepresented in biomedical research as defined by the National Science Foundation (NSF), your institution would meet the first prong of the RISE FOA’s eligibility requirement. The NSF defines these groups as African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, U.S. Pacific Islanders and persons with disabilities.

Some institutions might not have the explicit language in their mission statements but they may make the case that they have a long history of commitment to training and developing students from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical research.

Q. Can an institution with a RISE grant apply for other TWD programs?

A. Institutions eligible to apply for the RISE program may also apply for other TWD programs, except for the IMSD program.

Q. Can more than one department participate in the RISE grant proposal?

A. Yes. Although only one grant application may be submitted by each institution, participation of all departments relevant to biomedical sciences is highly encouraged since the RISE should be an institutional program.

Q. How is an institutional RISE program designed?

A. Institutional RISE program awards are provided to support student development and research training activities in the biomedical sciences. RISE applications must be based on the capabilities of the institution to provide students with the appropriate academic and research training needed to pursue a Ph.D. degree in the biomedical sciences. Applicants must conduct a comprehensive institutional self-assessment relative to its capacity to support students in their efforts to attain undergraduate and/or graduate degrees in the biomedical sciences. To that end, the self-assessment must provide baseline institutional data with respect to the baseline number of students retained and graduating in the sciences relevant to biomedical research. In addition, the self-assessment must contain information pertaining to institutional mission and core themes, current institutional resources and capacity, and indicators of institutional effectiveness toward achieving its mission as it relates to the biomedical science disciplines.

Q. What are the institutional options in the RISE program?

A. Unlike the previous RISE Program Announcement, the current announcement, PAR-16-361, does not require institutions to stratify by option. The TWD Division, however, continues to recognize and value the heterogeneity in institutional settings and institutional missions.

Q. Who is eligible to participate in the RISE program?

A. The RISE program is an institutional program and it is expected that program-supported activities will be open to all students at the institution. The program should not deny participation in program-supported activities to anyone based solely on his/her race, color, national origin, disability, religion, gender and age. The program-supported participants are selected by the applicant institution. To receive salary support from the RISE program, students must be U.S. citizens or non-citizen nationals or permanent residents, must be enrolled full time in academic degree programs in biomedical science fields at the applicant institution and be active RISE participants. A non-citizen national is a person who, although not a citizen of the United States, owes permanent allegiance to the U.S. This is generally a person born in a land that is not a state, but that is under U.S. sovereignty, jurisdiction or administration (i.e., American Samoa). An individual lawfully admitted for permanent residence must possess a currently valid Permanent Resident Card (USCIS Form I-551) or other legal verification of such status prior to appointment on the grant. Individuals on temporary visas, those seeking asylum or refugees are not eligible for support from the RISE program.

The purpose of the RISE program is to achieve greater participation in the biomedical research enterprise of this country of students from underrepresented groups. For the purpose of the RISE program underrepresented groups include those reported by the NSF as well as the National Academies to be nationally underrepresented in biomedical sciences (i.e., African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans (including Alaska natives), and natives of U.S. Pacific Islands and people with disabilities). Applicants may include and identify any other categories that institutional policies have determined to be underrepresented in biomedical research fields with a strong rationale, appropriate references and official validated documentation. Selection of program-supported participants should take into consideration whether the student’s participation would help achieve the overall goals/objectives of the proposed institutional program and the MBRS goals. It is the responsibility of the applicant institution to establish the qualifications of students prior to their selection for the RISE program.

Q. What is expected from individuals supported by the RISE program?

A. RISE program undergraduates at the B.S/B.A level and the graduate M.S. level are expected to matriculate into Ph.D. programs within 3 years of graduation. RISE program Ph.D. students are expected to complete their terminal degrees in biomedical research fields and advance to competing postdoctoral positions.

Q. What is the maximum level of support that can be requested for undergraduate students?

A. Support is allowed for eligible undergraduate students (B.S./B.A.) in the form of salary and wages. Stipends are not allowable for the RISE program. Salary support is allowed for undergraduate students’ active participation in student development and research education activities supported by the program, as long as there is an employee-employer relationship between the student and the institution. The total compensation must be reasonable and commensurate with the institution’s support scale for the work performed provided the following criteria are met:

  • It is the institution’s practice to provide compensation for all students in similar circumstances regardless of the source of support for the activity,
  • The undergraduate student is not supported for more than 15 hours per week during the academic year and not more than 40 hours per week during the summer, and
  • Student participation in the specific developmental activity is not a curriculum requirement for graduation.

A justification must be provided if the requested support for undergraduates is more than $12 per hour. Support for students is not provided for time spent by the students passively participating in RISE-sponsored, non-research activities (i.e., group-learning activities, attendance at conferences, etc.).

Q. What is the maximum level of support that can be requested for graduate students?

A. Support is allowed for eligible graduate (M.S./Ph.D.) students in the form of salary and wages. Stipends are not allowable for the RISE program. Graduate students may be supported on RISE funding usually up to 2 years if preparing for a M.S. degree and a total of 5 years (including any RISE funding for a M.S. degree) if preparing for a Ph.D. degree, provided their progress towards the degree is satisfactory. Graduate students (both M.S. and Ph.D.) are allowed tuition remission as part of a compensation package.

M.S. students may receive salary support for up to 20 hours a week during the academic year while they are fulfilling their course requirements, and 40 hours a week during the summer if no courses are being taken. Ph.D. students are allowed a salary compensation package that includes salary, fringe benefits, tuition and fees up to the maximum NIH-permitted annual graduate student support, which is NRSA level #0 for postdoctoral trainees, as indicated in the Graduate Student Compensation policy, located at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-02-017.html. (See the NIH Web page for the current figure http://grants.nih.gov/training/nrsa.htm.) It is an expectation of NIGMS that those students who are enrolled in Ph.D. programs as part of the RISE program will be trained to compete successfully for support from other departmental, federal or non-federal graduate-training sources for which they are eligible, in order to complete their programs.

Q. Can RISE-supported students receive additional support?

A. Program-supported students may not concurrently hold another federally sponsored stipend or fellowship, other federal award that duplicates RISE support, or supplemental salary support, e.g., from a mentor’s federal research grant. However, concurrent with RISE support, students may make use of federal educational loan funds and assistance under the Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act (G.I. Bill) or may receive funds from a Pell Grant, based on financial need. Such funds are not considered supplementation or compensation.

Q. How are program-supported students appointed to the RISE program?

A. Each year, program-supported students must be formally appointed to the RISE program using the NIH’s Statement of Appointment form (PHS 2271, http://grants.nih.gov/training/phs2271.pdf). The completed forms must be submitted to NIH with the annual progress report.

Q. How can an institution provide research experiences to RISE participants?

A. Institutions proposing research experiences must demonstrate that program participants will have meaningful research experiences in the laboratory of an active investigator who has extramural support and is actively publishing in peer-reviewed journals. Details on how RISE students will select a research laboratory or be matched with a mentor must be provided in the application, as well as the number of hours that the student will spend in the laboratory, what the research experience will consist of, and what the student is expected to learn or accomplish.

The TWD Division recognizes that some RISE-eligible institutions may not have enough active researchers with extramural funding to support on-campus research experiences. However, such institutions could create a biomedical interdisciplinary research training classroom/laboratory/course, as well as establish collaborative arrangements with research institutions that have a significant number of mentors with NIH or other extramural research support to have their students benefit from off-campus research experiences, especially during the summer. Thus, each RISE program is strongly encouraged to establish collaborations with institutions that have research-intensive environments (i.e., NIGMS IMSD and/or T32 institutions) in order to facilitate the networking and transition of RISE-supported students to T32 training programs, as well as to magnify the institutional impact of the program. Information about NIGMS training programs (T32) is available at http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Training.

Q. Can funds be requested for research mentoring?

A. Compensation for research mentoring may be requested only if research mentoring is not part of the faculty regular contractual duties and responsibilities and it is allowed by the institutional policies. Compensation must be commensurate with the number of students mentored.

Q. Is foreign or international travel allowed?

A. Foreign/international travel (including travel to Canada and Mexico) is allowed only for graduate students making oral presentations at recognized professional scientific meetings in their specific area of research.

Q. What are the purpose and the scope of evaluation?

A. The purpose of the evaluation is to provide information on the effectiveness of the program on both the students and the institution. It should provide a resource for self-improvement and a guide for institutionalization of effective strategies. The evaluation must assess the success of the program in achieving its goals and objectives and, on an ongoing basis, determine whether various milestones have been reached.

Thus, the emphasis of the evaluation activities should be on:

  • Assessing the overall impact of the program on the institution’s baseline numbers and efforts to accomplish its proposed goals of diversifying the institutional pool of students that complete Ph.D. degrees in biomedical sciences, and
  • Measuring improvement over time in the overall program outcomes as well as intermediate outcomes such as effectiveness of activities or other interventions.

It is expected that the evaluation will inform the senior leadership at the institution and help them decide which elements of the program should be applied more broadly and/or ultimately institutionalized.

The purpose of the evaluation plan in an application is to show reviewers that the applicant has a good plan to judge the effectiveness of the proposed program on both the students and the institution. The evaluation plan must indicate how the success of the program in achieving its goals and objectives will be assessed. Specific plans and procedures must be described to capture, analyze and report outcome measures as well as measures of program implementation and short-term outcomes such as outcomes of specific activities or interventions. The plan should be designed to assess and evaluate how the proposed program progresses toward meeting its goals, specific aims, measurable objectives and outcomes. A good evaluation plan will be based on appropriate literature and cited methodology. The plan should also identify the selected evaluator and present his/her credentials.

Applications that lack an evaluation plan will not be reviewed. The inclusion of evaluation instruments in the appendix is encouraged.

Q. Who should be the program evaluator and what is his/her role in the program?

A. In general, the evaluator (either external or from the applicant institution) must have training and experience in evaluation methodology and statistics. The specific tools to be used in the evaluation (e.g., surveys, interviews, databases) will dictate the specific skills needed.

The evaluator’s responsibilities usually include preparation of reports and recommendations for the PD and institutional administrators; interaction with program staff and staff from other campus-wide student academic preparation and educational partnership and research training programs; making recommendations of new administrative structures, policies and procedures; establishing and maintaining contact with institutional officials for the collection and exchange of information; gathering data and information; finding and evaluating alternative solutions and making recommendations for program direction. The evaluator also provides the conceptual framework for institutional change and suggests ways of reducing the resistance to change. He/she will provide training and technical assistance, as necessary, to staff and to partners to ensure the integrity and adequacy of data captured and reported.

Q. How much is allowed for a student development program evaluation?

A. Program evaluation costs are allowed up to a maximum of $3,000 for the 5-year project period.

Q. Which application forms should be used to prepare a new application, and where can they be found?

A. Applicants must download the SF424 (R&R) application forms and SF424 (R&R) Application Guide for this Program Announcement through http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/apply-for-grants.html Link to external Web site. Only the forms package directly attached to the RISE Program Announcement can be used. You will not be able to use any other SF424 (R&R) forms (e.g., sample forms, forms from another FOA) although some of the "Attachment" files may be useable for more than one FOA.

Q. Are there any supplemental instructions for the RISE application?

A. There are no separate supplemental instructions for the new (Type 1) or competing renewal (Type 2) applications. Applicants should follow the instructions in the RISE Program Announcement.

For noncompeting continuation applications (Type 5) applicants must follow the NIH Research Performance Progress Report (RPPR) (forms and instructions are available at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/forms.htm) and the guidelines suggested in the RISE Supplemental Instructions.

Q. What is the application receipt date(s) for the RISE application?

A. The receipt date for a RISE application is June 20, 2013. Applications must be successfully received by Grants.gov Link to external Web site no later than 5:00 p.m. local time (of the applicant institution/organization).

Q. Can applications be submitted in paper format, or must applicants submit it electronically?

A. Applications must be submitted electronically through Grants.gov Link to external Web site using the SF424 (R&R) forms and the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide. Applications may not be submitted in paper format.

A registration process is necessary before submission and applicants are highly encouraged to start the process at least four weeks prior to the grant submission date. See Section IV of the RISE Program Announcement.

Q. What is the page limit for the RISE application?

A. The page limit for the Research Plan is 25 pages, including tables, figures, diagrams and charts. The Introduction (required for a resubmission application) is limited to three pages (not counted toward the 25 pages of the Research Plan).

Q. What is the best way to present information in the application?

A. Applicants are strongly encouraged to provide the required information using downloadable sample table formats. These tables can be downloaded from the RISE Web site in the section titled RISE Sample Formats for Competing New (Type 1) and Competing Renewal (Type 2) Applications under Competing Renewal (Type 2) RISE Grant Applications. Applicants must be aware that the Research Plan must include all summarizing data tables, graphs, figures, diagrams and charts. Applicants may use the appendix to include evaluation instruments as well as detailed information that further clarifies the summarized data tables included in the Research Plan. The summarizing data tables in the body of the Research Plan must include clear and precise statements of the location of the required detailed information in the appendix.

Q. What are the anticipated start dates?

A. We will be reissuing this funding opportunity announcement in the coming months. At that time, we will provide an update to the earliest anticipated start date.

Q. What are allowable and unallowable costs?

A. Major allowable and unallowable costs are outlined in the RISE Program Announcement (see sections IV.2 and IV.5 ), and additional information on allowable and unallowable costs can be found in NIH Grants Policy Statement, and under the Terms and Conditions in the Notice of Grants Award.

Q. How important is the budget justification?

A. Reviewers are instructed to base their budget recommendations on the justification provided by the applicant. Therefore, it is important that each budget item is fully justified. Do not assume that the need is obvious. Explain the relevance of each item for the completion of the project.

Q. If an institution does not have any research on campus but proposes to have RISE students engaged in extramurally-funded research at other research-intensive institutions, does the applicant institution have to submit animal care and human subject certification forms?

A. No. However, before students are permitted to work on funded research projects of mentors involving vertebrate animals and/or human subjects, whether on-campus or off-campus, applicants are expected to fulfill the institutional and Federal requirements for these activities, e.g., Institutional Review Board and Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approvals and obtain the student research certifications.

Q. How is my RISE application reviewed? What are the review criteria?

A. The TWD-C Review Subcommittee (or a Special Emphasis Panel) reviews RISE applications. The review criteria are outlined in the RISE Program Announcement (see Section V). A summary of the reviewers' comments and the priority score are communicated to the applicant in the form of a summary statement. The National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council provides the second level of review.


 

Renewal Applications

Q. What application forms should be used to prepare a competing renewal application, and where can they be found?

A. Applicants must download the SF424 (R&R) application forms and SF424 (R&R) Application Guide for this FOA through http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/apply-for-grants.html Link to external Web site. Only the forms package directly attached to the RISE Program Announcement can be used. You will not be able to use any other SF424 (R&R) forms (e.g., sample forms, forms from another FOA) although some of the "Attachment" files may be useable for more than one PA.

Q. What are the guidelines for the content and format of the Research Plan of RISE renewal applications?

A. The 25-page limit for the Research Plan for all applications (new and renewal) includes all summarizing data tables, graphs, figures, diagrams and charts. Applicants may use the appendix to include evaluation instruments as well as detailed information that further clarifies the summarized data tables included in the Research Plan. The summarizing data tables in the body of the Research Plan must include clear and precise statements of the location of the required detailed information in the appendix.

Q. What should be included in the progress report section of a competing renewal (Type 2) RISE application, and how is the progress on outcomes evaluated?

A. For renewal applications, a detailed progress report must be included. Applications with only one previous funding cycle must provide information on the past funding cycle. Applications with more than one previous funding cycle must provide information on the past two consecutive funding cycles. In the report, state the original and specific measurable objectives, anticipated milestones and outcomes, as well as a summary of the accomplishments of the RISE program.

Programs with an undergraduate component must report:

  • The number of the RISE-supported undergraduate students.
  • The number that participated in academic and summer research experiences.
  • The status of RISE-supported students (number who graduated, remain in the RISE program or withdrew from the RISE program).
  • The number who graduated with undergraduate degrees in biomedical-related disciplines and pursued advanced degrees.
  • The number who matriculated into Ph.D. programs in biomedical sciences (at the applicant institution or elsewhere).
  • The status of those who entered Ph.D. programs (number who completed graduate training, remain in graduate training, or withdrew from graduate training).
  • Publications.

Programs with an M.S. graduate component must report:

  • The number of the RISE-supported M.S. graduate students.
  • The RISE-supported M.S. graduate students status (number who graduated, remain in training or withdrew from graduate training).
  • The number of RISE-supported M.S. graduate students who matriculated in Ph.D. programs in biomedical sciences (at the applicant institution or elsewhere).
  • The status of those RISE-supported M.S. graduate students who entered Ph.D. programs (number who completed doctoral training, remain in doctoral training, or withdrew from doctoral training).
  • Publications.

Programs with a Ph.D. graduate component must report:

  • The number of the RISE-supported Ph.D. graduate students.
  • The RISE-supported Ph.D. graduate students status (number who graduated, remain in the RISE program or withdrew from the RISE program).
  • The number of RISE-supported Ph.D. graduate students who transitioned to other training mechanisms (i.e., T32 programs, fellowships, research grants).
  • The number of RISE-supported Ph.D. graduate students who pursue(d) postdoctoral positions and the number who pursue(d) academic, research-related or non-research-related career paths.
  • Publications.

Describe the impact and/or value of RISE program activities on the enrollment numbers, profile, academic environment and graduation rates of underrepresented students and other related aspects of the institution. Describe what has been learned through the program evaluation and any changes made in the program as a result of the evaluation.

Applicants submitting renewal applications are strongly encouraged to provide the required information using the downloadable sample table formats that can be found on the RISE Web site in the section titled RISE Sample Formats for Competing New (Type 1) and Competing Renewal (Type 2) Applications under Competing Renewal (Type 2) RISE Grant Applications (http://www.nigms.nih.gov/pages/Training/RISE/Pages/RISESampleTables.aspx). The progress report section of the Research Plan must include all summarizing data tables, graphs, figures, diagrams and charts. Applicants may use the appendix to include evaluation instruments as well as detailed information that further clarifies the summarized data tables included in the Research Plan. The summarizing data tables in the body of the Research Plan must include clear and precise statements of the location of the required detailed information in the appendix.

The competing renewal application is treated like any new application except that the progress on the present program is also evaluated based on the goals and objectives outlined in the original application. Renewal applications that do not contain a progress report will be returned to the applicant.

Q. What are the guidelines for the required program-supported participant information to be included in the Research Plan of renewal applications?

A. Renewal applications must include in the appendix a list of appointed (program-supported) undergraduate (B.S./B.A.) and graduate (M.S./Ph.D.) participants, as applicable, including name; contact information (phone, address, e-mail); underrepresented group; gender; current academic status; degree pursued and institution.

Renewal applications must also include a description of plans to enhance recruitment of a diverse participant pool as well as include a detailed account of recruitment during the previous funding period. Information must be included on successful and unsuccessful recruitment strategies including aggregate information on the distribution of:

  • Participants who applied for admission or positions within the department(s)/program(s) relative to the research education program,
  • Participants who were offered admission to or a position within the department(s)/program(s),
  • Participants who actually enrolled in the academic program relevant to the research education program,
  • Participants who were appointed to the research education program.

For those individuals who were enrolled in the program, the report should include information about the duration of education and whether those individuals finished the program in good standing.

The Research Plan in renewal applications can include cumulative tables to summarize the required information on program-supported participants. Each summarizing table must include a clear and precise statement of the location of the required detailed information in the appendix.

Q. What happens to grant renewal applications if evaluation of the outcomes does not show improvement as proposed in the original application?

A. It depends on the reasons for the lack of progress during the past grant period. If an evaluation analysis of the outcomes identifies the causes for failure and alternative strategies to overcome the problems were proposed, the application could engender enthusiasm among reviewers. A careful analysis of the process and the outcomes in the previous application and a logical justification of the new approaches proposed in the renewal application are very important in convincing the reviewers favorably.

Q. What application forms should be used to prepare a competing renewal application?

A. Applicants must download the SF424 (R&R) Application Forms and SF424 (R&R) Application Guide for this FOA through http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/apply-for-grants.html Link to external Web site. Only the forms package directly attached to the RISE Program Announcement can be used. You will not be able to use any other SF424 (R&R) forms (e.g., sample forms, forms from another FOA) although some of the "Attachment" files may be useable for more than one FOA.


 

Resubmission of Applications

Q. Where does an applicant respond to the comments of the reviewers?

A. The applicant should acknowledge the reviewer's concerns and issues in the Introduction section (limited to three pages, see Form 424 instructions), and explain how the revised application is different from the previous application. Changes to the application in response to the critiques should be highlighted by change in font or indentation as outlined in the instructions. The concerns and issues are noted in the Resume and Summary of Discussion section and/or under each reviewer's critique of the summary statement. If the applicant does not agree with a reviewer's comments, the rationale for disagreeing with the reviewer should be explained.


 

Funding

Q. What is a fundable priority score? How are the funding decisions made for a RISE application?

A. There is no predetermined fundable score for a RISE application. Applications compete for available funds with all other recommended applications from eligible institutions. The following will be considered in making funding decisions:

  • Scientific merit of the proposed project as determined by peer review.
  • Availability of funds.
  • Relevance to program priorities.
  • Research education development needs of the institution.
  • Geographical distribution.
  • Portfolio balance.

Q. An application was submitted on X date. When will the applicant know if it will be funded?

A. Although NIH is trying to shorten this time interval, the current time from submission to award is about 10-11 months. During this time, your application is received, assigned to NIGMS and referred to a study section for the first level of review. After it is scored, it undergoes the second level of review by the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council. Program staff then makes funding recommendations to the NIGMS director. Until funding recommendations are approved, TWD staff will not be able to provide the applicant definite information on the funding status of an application.

Q. What should applicants do if not funded?

A. Be prepared to revise and resubmit your application. Revising is your opportunity to respond to the criticisms of the Scientific Review Group and use their comments to improve your grant application. First, talk with your program director to review your summary statement and to obtain advice. It is also wise to ask someone experienced in grantsmanship and not involved in your RISE program to review your application, summary statement and revision plans.

Q. What happens if there is money left over at the end of the year? Is carryover of funds allowed?

A. RISE grants have Expanded Authorities as of April 1, 2009. Please note that rebudgeting of funds originally requested for participant research salaries requires NIGMS prior approval. Contact the grant program official at TWD for further information.

Q. How does an institution process a no-cost extension if this is the last year of the grant?

A. A grantee institution can extend the project period using eRA Commons for up to 1 year if the request is submitted on or before the anniversary date of the parent grant, provided you do not change the scope of the program. If a no-cost extension is needed, it must be done within 90 days before the end of the grant by the institution’s grants office.

Please note that only students already in the program can be supported while a grant is on no-cost extension.


 

Progress Reports and Noncompeting Applications

Q. Is a progress report (noncompeting continuation application) required each year? Which application forms should be used to prepare my progress report, and where can they be found?

A. A progress report (noncompeting continuation application) is required annually to request support for the following year of the grant period. Failure to submit a satisfactory progress report by the deadline (see below) might lead to delay, suspension or termination of the grant. Progress reports to continue support of a Public Health Service (PHS) grant must be prepared using the NIH Research Performance Progress Report (RPPR) (forms and instructions are available at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/forms.htm). Reports must be prepared following the guidelines suggested in the NIH Research Performance Progress Report (RPPR) Instruction Guide [PDF, 2.4 MB].

Q. What information must be included in the annual progress report (noncompeting continuation application)? What is the page limit for the progress report?

A. Grantees should follow the current RPPR format provided within the guidelines. In general, the progress report should summarize the progress achieved in the reporting period with respect to the RISE program goals. The narrative part is limited to three pages, and numerical and other data may be presented in tabular form (tables and figures are not counted in the three-page limit).

Q. When and where are the annual progress reports (noncompeting continuation applications) submitted?

A. Progress reports are required to continue support of a PHS grant and for NIH grantees, and must be submitted 2 months before the beginning date of the next budget period using the RPPR (forms and instructions are available at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/forms.htm). In addition to the RPPR instructions, follow the guidelines below to prepare the progress report.

Grantees can access a Web site hosted by the NIH Office of Policy for Extramural Research Administration to determine which progress reports are due. The site located at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/submitapplication.htm#nc. Grantees are responsible for periodically checking the list, which is updated on/around the 30th of each month. In addition to this Web site, e-mail reminders are sent to the PI.

Progress Report Submission Guidelines

Streamlined Non-Competing Award Procedures (SNAP)

Progress Reports must be submitted following the Streamlined Noncompeting Award Procedures (SNAP) as defined by the NIH Grants Policy Statement. If your institution has never used eSNAP before, please review the eSNAP User Guide [PDF, 1MB] as it has information on how to enable the eSNAP feature for your institution as well as step-by-step instructions on how to submit your annual progress reports electronically.

Q. Who should an applicant contact for additional questions regarding the RISE program institutional eligibility, policies, review process, budget and grants issues?

A. For institutional eligibility and program policies regarding proposal application and submission that are not related to existing grants:

Alexandra Ainsztein, Ph.D.
Program Director
National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH
45 Center Drive, MSC 6200
Bethesda, MD 20892-6200
Telephone: 301-594-0828
E-mail: alexandra.ainsztein@nih.gov

For questions on the review of applications:

Brian Pike, Ph.D.
Acting Chief, Office of Scientific Review
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
National Institutes of Health
45 Center Drive MSC 6200
Bethesda, MD 20892-6200
Tel: 301-594-3907
E-mail: pikbr@nigms.nih.gov

For questions on grants management and fiscal matters:

Lori Burge
Grants Management Officer
Grants Management Branch
Division of Extramural Activities
National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH
45 Center Drive, MSC 6200
Room 2AN.44J
Bethesda, MD 20892-6200
Tel: 301-451-3781
Fax: 301-480-2554
E-mail: burgel@nigms.nih.gov

This page last reviewed on July 08, 2016