Skip Over Navigation Links

News

March 23, 2015 • Scripps Research Institute

March 05, 2015 • Cold Harbor Spring Laboratory

October 30, 2014 • Michigan State University

April 30, 2014 • ​University of Washington

July 12, 2013 • Carnegie Institution for Science

July 09, 2013 • Georgia Institute of Technology

April 10, 2013 • University of Michigan Medical School

April 07, 2013 • Georgia Institute of Technology

November 08, 2012 • University of Washington

October 26, 2012 • Carnegie Institution

September 28, 2012 • University of California, Davis

September 18, 2012 • Salk Institute for Biological Studies

August 21, 2012 • University of Michigan

August 03, 2012 • Mount Sinai School of Medicine

July 05, 2012 • Gladstone Institutes

May 03, 2012 • University of North Carolina Health Care

March 23, 2012 • University of Washington

March 01, 2012 • University of Georgia

November 30, 2011 • University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

November 15, 2011 • University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

November 14, 2011 • University of Georgia

October 27, 2011 • Harvard Medical School

October 27, 2011 • University of California, Berkeley

May 19, 2011 • University of Pennsylvania

May 16, 2011 • Washington University School of Medicine

May 12, 2011 • Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

March 30, 2011 • University of North Carolina

February 04, 2011 • University of Wisconsin-Madison

December 15, 2010 • University of Illinois

December 12, 2010 • Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

November 14, 2010 • University of Wisconsin-Madison

October 14, 2010 • Rockefeller University

September 02, 2010 • University of Georgia

August 01, 2010 • University of Pennsylvania

June 09, 2010 • Mount Sinai School of Medicine

March 15, 2010 • Wistar Institute

February 22, 2010 • Rockefeller University Press

December 15, 2009 • University of California, Los Angeles

Tissue-specific genes, thought to be dormant in embryonic stem cells, are indeed marked by transcription factors, according to a new NIGMS-supported study.

November 15, 2009 • Omaha World-Herald

A Nebraska researcher was recently selected to receive federal stimulus funds to extend his work on induced pluripotent stem cells.

October 28, 2009 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

NIGMS is using $5.4 million of Recovery Act funds to accelerate basic studies of induced pluripotent stem cells.

October 19, 2009 • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

An NIGMS-funded study suggests that small mechanical forces on embryonic stem cells can coax them to develop in specific ways.

October 07, 2009 • University of Washington

NIGMS-funded bioengineers have succeeded in building human tissue patches with supply lines for the oxygen and nutrients that living cells require.

July 29, 2009 • Worcester Polytechnic Institute

An NIGMS-supported research team has discovered a novel way to turn on stem cell genes in human skin cells without the risks associated with inserting extra genes or using viruses.

March 26, 2009 • University of Wisconsin, Madison

NIGMS-funded researchers have tracked how DNA copying gets reorganized as embryonic stem cells become specialized.

October 17, 2008 • Forsyth Institute

NIGMS-funded researchers have shown that electrical signals are a powerful control mechanism for modulating embryonic stem cell behavior.

October 13, 2008 • Florida State University

NIGMS-funded researchers have tracked how DNA copying gets reorganized as embryonic stem cells become specialized.

September 17, 2008 • Forsyth Institute

NIGMS-funded researchers have discovered genes in planaria flatworms that are also used in mammalian stem cell regulatory pathways.

September 17, 2008 • University of North Carolina

NIGMS-funded researchers transformed human skin cells into pluripotent stem cells and then to cells that can make the hormone insulin.

September 11, 2008 • University of Utah

NIGMS-funded researchers have used synthetic molecules to mark the DNA of planarians, a kind of regenerating worm that could serve as a model for stem cell biology.

August 04, 2008 • University of Georgia

University of Georgia researcher Stephen Dalton will lead a new research program focused on understanding the unique properties of embryonic stem cells.

August 04, 2008 • University of Wisconsin

University of Wisconsin researcher James Thomson has been awarded an NIGMS grant to pursue a research program that addresses some of the most fundamental questions about stem cells.

May 04, 2008 • Baylor College of Medicine

An NIGMS-funded study explored how two critical embryonic cell proteins help maintain stem cells in their flexible state.

December 20, 2007 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

A stem cell research breakthrough partially supported by NIGMS is tops on two lists of science advances made during 2007.

November 20, 2007 • University of Wisconsin, Madison

NIGMS-funded researchers report the genetic reprogramming of human skin cells to create cells indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells, an accomplishment that should speed up stem cell research and remove ethical and legal constraints to their use.

March 11, 2007 • Burnham Institute

NIGMS-funded researchers have successfully used human embryonic stem cells to treat mice with a neurodegenerative disease related to Tay-Sachs, a lethal genetic disorder.

April 20, 2006 • Broad Institute

A research team supported by NIGMS has discovered specific DNA molecular imprints in mouse embryonic stem cells. The findings could shed light on the unique ability of these cells to develop into virtually any cell type in the body.

April 20, 2006 • Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Embryonic stem cells may one day provide a means to treat disease, but according to new reports, they are already revealing remarkable insights into the mysteries of how humans develop.

February 24, 2006 • University of California, Riverside

NIGMS-supported researchers have discovered a molecular mechanism that directs the fate and function of cells during animal development. The findings hold promise for the advancement of cancer and stem-cell research.

January 01, 2006 • University of Wisconsin, Madison

NIGMS-supported scientists have developed a precisely defined stem cell culture system free of animal cells. The new work helps move stem cells a small step closer to clinical applications by completely ridding the growth medium of animal products that could harbor viruses or other deleterious agents.

August 10, 2005 • Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Researchers at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine have been awarded $3 million over 3 years to establish an Exploratory Center for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. The center joins 5 other such centers funded by NIGMS.

 

August 09, 2005 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

NIGMS has funded three new Exploratory Centers for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. These centers join three others that the institute funded in September 2003. All are limited to using federally approved stem cell lines.

July 15, 2005 • National Institutes of Health

NIGMS-sponsored workshop highlights recent progress in human embryonic stem cell research and outlines some of the remaining challenges.

July 05, 2005 • University of Minnesota

NIGMS-supported researchers have identified a group of genes that are involved the development blood precursor cells, a discovery that brings researchers a step closer to harnessing the power of stem cells for disease treatments.

June 14, 2005 • Northwestern University

Why do stem cells continue to divide and renew themselves long after the point where other cells stop? NIGMS-funded researchers now suggest that tiny bits of genetic material called microRNAs shut off the signals that end cell division in most other cells.

May 18, 2005 • Duke University

Children with a fatal genetic disorder called Krabbe Disease can be saved and their brain development preserved if they receive stem cells from umbilical cord blood before symptoms develop, according to a new NIGMS-funded study.

September 29, 2003 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

To elucidate the basic biology of stem cells, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences is funding three Exploratory Centers for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.


This page last reviewed on December 30, 2013