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June 12, 2014 • ​University of California, San Francisco

October 01, 2013 • The Ohio State University

June 13, 2013 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

June 05, 2013 • University of Florida College of Pharmacy

August 15, 2012 • University of Maryland

June 25, 2012 • University of Florida

March 25, 2012 • Brigham and Women's Hospital

March 15, 2012 • Stanford School of Medicine

March 14, 2012 • Stanford University School of Medicine

December 16, 2011 • University at Buffalo

December 06, 2011 • Genome Research

October 27, 2011 • UNC Cancer Center

September 16, 2011 • U.S. News & World Report

August 17, 2011 • Stanford University

May 25, 2011 • Stanford University

February 06, 2011 • St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

September 28, 2010 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

September 21, 2010 • University of Pennsylvania Almanac

September 07, 2010 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

September 07, 2010 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

May 21, 2010 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

April 29, 2010 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

December 16, 2009 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

The new projects, which focus on drugs for depression, HIV/AIDS, cardiovascular disease and cancer, bring to 15 the total number of projects in the Global Alliance for Pharmacogenomics.

August 25, 2009 • University of Maryland Medical Center

NIGMS-supported researchers have identified a common gene variant carried by as many as a third of the population that plays a major role in determining why some people do not respond to an anti-clotting medication, Plavix.

August 25, 2009 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

A new study reports that a gene variant carried by about a third of the population plays a major role in this group’s response to an anti-clotting medicine, clopidogrel (Plavix). People with the variant produce a defective version of the CYP2C19 enzyme and are less able to activate the drug, placing them at increased risk for dangerous events like strokes and heart attacks. 

August 16, 2009 • St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

NIGMS-supported scientists have identified inherited variations in two genes that account for 37 percent of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, including a gene that may help predict drug response.

May 19, 2009 • St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

NIGMS-funded researchers have discovered a new class of mutations linked to cases of childhood leukemia with a high risk of relapse and death.

February 18, 2009 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

A world wide team of researchers used computer modeling to address one of the trickiest drugs to prescribe—the blood-thinner warfarin. To test the gene-based strategy in patients, NIH is launching a large-scale clinical trial.

January 27, 2009 • St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Scientists in the NIGMS-funded Pharmacogenetics Research Network have linked scores of genetic variations with how children respond to leukemia drugs.

November 10, 2008 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

U.S. and Japanese scientists expand their pharmacogenomics collaboration with five new projects.

April 14, 2008 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

U.S. and Japanese scientists partner to study genetic factors that influence the safety and effectiveness of medicines. 

February 28, 2008 • University of Chicago Medical Center

Researchers in the NIGMS-funded Pharmacogenetics Research Network have found that differences in gene expression levels between population groups can affect how they respond to drugs or fight off specific infections.

August 28, 2007 • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

People taking low doses of the cancer drug irinotecan need not undergo genetic testing first, say NIGMS-funded researchers.

August 16, 2007 • Food and Drug Administration

Work by investigators affiliated with the NIH Pharmacogenetics Research Network has led to changes in the prescribing information of a widely used blood-thinning drug, warfarin (Coumadin).

May 11, 2007 • St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

An NIGMS-funded study has discovered variations in certain genes that make some children with leukemia susceptible to toxic side effects from common chemotherapy drugs.

March 20, 2007 • St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

The longest follow-up study ever done on children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, supported in part by NIGMS, identifies risks for survivors later in life.

March 07, 2007 • St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

NIGMS-funded researchers scanned 350,000 locations across the genome of 242 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia to identify new mutations that contribute to this common childhood cancer.

February 15, 2007 • Johns Hopkins University

NIGMS-funded researchers have created a computer tool to help predict which genetic mutations might affect a person's risk for cancer.

April 18, 2006 • Washington University

Findings made by NIGMS-supported investigators suggest that traditional cancer treatments, which base drug regimens on a tumor's anatomical location, should eventually be replaced with therapies based on a tumor's pharmacologic profile.

January 25, 2006 • SRI International

SRI International and the University of California, San Francisco, have been awarded $10 million to study the genetic basis for variation in response to medications for tobacco dependence. The new program will be part of the Pharmacogenetics Research Network (PGRN).

January 04, 2006 • Washington University

Chances are good that a medication you take is one of several drugs that can be affected by genetic factors, according to a team of NIGMS-supported researchers.

December 21, 2005 • University of Chicago

Researchers supported through the NIH Pharmacogenetics Research Network have licensed a genetic test for patients with colorectal cancer to the Mayo Clinic. The agreement will make the test available to patients nationwide starting this month.

December 16, 2005 • Mayo Clinic

One of the most commonly administered drugs for breast cancer, tamoxifen, may not be as effective for women who inherit a common genetic change, according to an NIGMS-supported study.

September 28, 2005 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

August 29, 2005 • Washington University in St. Louis

NIGMS has awarded $10 million to researchers investigating how well anti-cancer therapies work in different patients. The funds will further work begun in 2001 as part of the NIGMS-supported Pharmacogenetics Research Network, a nationwide collaboration of scientists.

August 18, 2005 • University of Florida

July 13, 2005 • University of Chicago Medical Center

June 02, 2005 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Variations in a gene involved in blood clotting may explain why certain people require a lower or higher dose to get the full benefits of the anticoagulant drug warfarin, say NIGMS-funded researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle and Washington University in St. Louis.

April 02, 2002 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

November 09, 2001 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

October 26, 2001 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

September 04, 2001 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

June 01, 2001 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

April 10, 2001 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

August 08, 2000 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences

April 04, 2000 • National Institute of General Medical Sciences


This page last reviewed on November 06, 2014